Autmn Sims
Emergent Literacy
 
  Rationale:  To learn to read and spell children need to know that letters stand for phonemes. Before children can match letters to phonemes, they have to be able to recognize phonemes. This lesson will help children recognize the /k/ phoneme in words.

Materials: Chart paper with tongue twister: Kenny wasnít kind in kindergarten when he kicked Kate in the kitchen.; flash cards with pictures of a cat, ball, key, can fork, bat, glove; white drawing paper; crayons; picture page includes pictures of a clock, coat, dog, doll, comb, and a pizza; The Letters are Lost by Lisa Campbell Ernst

Procedure: 1. To begin the lesson, I will explain to the students how our written language is a special code. In order for the students to learn how to read, they must be able to tell which sounds go with which letter. "Today we are going to listen for the /k/ sound in words. The /k/ sound can be spelled with the letter c or k."
2. "To help you remember the /k/ sound you might think of the sound you hear when a bat hits a baseball, /k/.  The ball and the bat together make the /k/ sound that sounds like a /k/rash."
3. Next I will ask the students to do a tongue twister with me.  I will hold up a piece of chart paper that reads: Kenny wasn't kind in kindergarten when he kicked Kate in the kitchen.  I will read it first then have the students say it with me.  "Now that I have read the tongue twister to you, I want you to read along with me."
4."Now letís say the tongue twister again.  When I hear a word with the /k/ sound Iím going to raise my hand and I want you to do the same."  After practicing a few times, I will ask them to do it on their own.  "Now I want you to do it without my help."
5. Students will be given primary paper and a pencil and I will show them how the letters c and k are written.  "First, letís write the letter c.  Start a little below the fence and curve down to the left to the sidewalk.   Now letís all try it together.  Good, now letís try k.  Start at the sky and come straight down to the sidewalk.  Pick up you pencil and start at the fence.  Go down the slide (to the left) halfway between the fence and sidewalk.  Then slide back down to the right toward the sidewalk.  Now letís practice together."  They will also have the opportunity to practice on their own.
6. I will hold up some flash cards with pictures of a cat, ball, key, hit, can, kick, and fork.  Students will be given white drawing paper and a crayon.  "Every time I read a word that has the /k/ sound I want you to draw a picture of it on your paper."
7. Read the book The Letters are Lost by Lisa Campbell Ernst.  Have the children say /k/rash every time they hear the /k/ sound.  "I'm going to read a book and every time you hear the /k/ sound I want you to draw a picture of what happened in the story."
8. For assessment, distribute a picture page and help the students name each picture.  Ask them
to circle the pictures with the /k/ sound.  (Picture page includes pictures of a clock, coat,
dog, doll, comb, and a pizza.)

References:
Eldgredge, J. Lloyd. (1995). Teaching Decoding in Holistic Classrooms. New Jersey: Prenctice Hall.
     (p. 16)
www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/illum/bucklau/html(Lauren Buck) "Sh, Sh, Please Hush"
www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/illum/smithmg/html(Elizabeth Smith) "Choo, Choo"

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