Happy Henry is Hungry
Beginning Reading
Mariah Hart






Rationale: Children need to understand that each letter stands for a different phoneme in order to be able to map out an entire word. Stop sounds are difficult to master since a student must completely stop the sound. This lesson will help children master the /h/ in spoken words by participating in activities using /h/.

Materials: Primary paper, pencils for all students, poster board with Happy Henry is Hungry for Hotdogs written on it, book dealing with a character with the /h/ sound in their name or largely used throughout book, blackboard, chalk

Procedure:
1. Today we are going to learn a sound that you hear everyday. /h/ is all around us and today we are going to learn what letter makes the /h/ sound. .. The /h/ sound is made by the letter h.
2. I want everyone to put their hand in front of their mouth and make a sound like me./h/.. Do you feel the air blowing on your hand? Now put your hand on your jaw ... make the /h/ sound again... do you feel your jaw move down when you make the sound?
3. Now lets look at this tongue twister: Read it to students "Happy Henry is Hungry for Hotdogs".. I want all of us to read it together 4 times.. Ready GO...
Now Read it saying the /h/ REALLY loud... ready.. GO... now lets try saying it but stop right after the /h/ sound.. let me show you /h/ appy /h/ enry is /h/ ungry for /h/ otdogs... Great job with the tongue twister
4.Lets try to write the letter that makes the /h/ sound. Take out paper and pencils. Start at the top and go straight down to the road. Now head up half way to your friends house and make a turn around because you forgot your favorite toy.
5. Read a book dealing with characters with an /h/ in their name.
6. Lets practice writing /h/ sounds… write on the board: hat, hog, hip, hand, harp.. Now students I want you to write these words on your paper. After students are finished have students read the words out loud.
7.For assessment, take out the picture cards and show them to the students asking which ones have the /h/? ... How do you know?

Reference: Murray, Dr. Bruce.  2001. The Reading Genie Website. www.auburn.edu/rdggenie
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Rationale: Children need to understand that each letter stands for a different phoneme in order to be able to map out an entire word. Stop sounds are difficult to master since a student must completely stop the sound. This lesson will help children master the /h/ in spoken words by participating in activities using /h/.

Materials: Primary paper, pencils for all students, poster board with Happy Henry is Hungry for Hotdogs written on it, book dealing with a character with the /h/ sound in their name or largely used throughout book, blackboard, chalk

Procedure:
1. Today we are going to learn a sound that you hear everyday. /h/ is all around us and today we are going to learn what letter makes the /h/ sound. .. The /h/ sound is made by the letter h.
2. I want everyone to put their hand in front of their mouth and make a sound like me./h/.. Do you feel the air blowing on your hand? Now put your hand on your jaw ... make the /h/ sound again... do you feel your jaw move down when you make the sound?
3. Now lets look at this tongue twister: Read it to students "Happy Henry is Hungry for Hotdogs".. I want all of us to read it together 4 times.. Ready GO...
Now Read it saying the /h/ REALLY loud... ready.. GO... now lets try saying it but stop right after the /h/ sound.. let me show you /h/ appy /h/ enry is /h/ ungry for /h/ otdogs... Great job with the tongue twister
4.Lets try to write the letter that makes the /h/ sound. Take out paper and pencils. Start at the top and go straight down to the road. Now head up half way to your friends house and make a turn around because you forgot your favorite toy.
5. Read a book dealing with characters with an /h/ in their name.
6. Lets practice writing /h/ sounds… write on the board: hat, hog, hip, hand, harp.. Now students I want you to write these words on your paper. After students are finished have students read the words out loud.
7.For assessment, take out the picture cards and show them to the students asking which ones have the /h/? ... How do you know?

Reference: Murray, Dr. Bruce.  2001. The Reading Genie Website. www.auburn.edu/rdggenie

Click here to return to Challenges