I Say You Say
Emergent Literacy
By Kellie Edberg

Rationale:  Research indicates that early phoneme awareness is strongly related to later reading.  However, an awareness of syllables, onsets, and rimes develops before an awareness of phonemes.  The first set of suggestions focuses on ways to expose children to word play to prepare them for phoneme awareness.  This lesson will help children identify that the difference between rhyming words is in the initial sounds.  They will explore word families also by supplying initial sounds to complete them.

Materials:  chart with poem, rhyming word worksheet

Procedures:  (1) Introduce the lesson by explaining and modeling rhyme.  "I am going to say two words: c-a-t - f-a-t.  I want you to tell me if the two words sound alike.  This is called a rhyme.  Let me show you.  C-a-t and f-a-t have the same sound at the end so they rhyme.  C-a-t and m-o-p do not rhyme because they don’t have the same sound at the end."

(2) Tell students:  Listen to these two words pail-tail.  Now say the two words with me pail-tail.  Do these two words rhyme? (Yes)  Put your thumbs up like this if they rhyme.  Listen to these two words: cow-pig.  Now say the two words with me: cow-pig.  Do these two words rhyme? (No) Put your thumbs down like this if they do not rhyme.  Listen to these sets of words.  Thumbs up if they rhyme.  Thumbs down if they do not rhyme.  Here we go… (1) fin-win  (2) rug-mug  (3) hat-dress  (4)  pan-man  (5) bird-book
(6) tock-rock  (7) bet-get  (8) cup-dog

(3) Review initial and final sounds with the class.  Provide the class with two rhyming words and ask what the difference between them is.  Select a final sound next.  Call on a student to make two words using the ending provided until every student has had a turn.

(4) Let's play a game called "I say, you say."  I say fat, you say … you might say rat because they have the same ending sound and therefore rhyme.  Here we go…
(1) I say dock (2) I say top (3) I say man (4) I say see (5) I say more (6) I say time
(7) I say train (8) I say pot

(5) Let's play a game called Finish this rhyme… I start the rhyme like this red and bed, blue and ? You might say glue because they have the same ending sound and therefore rhyme.  Here we go… (1) blue and glue, can and ?  (2) can and man, rock and ?  (3) rock and clock, rain and ? (4) rain and train, hand and ? (5) hand and sand, click and ? (6) click and sick, pot and ? (7) pot and cot, loose and ? (8) loose and goose, mop and ?

(6) Let's read this poem together. (Have pre-made chart with poem.)
Frogs jump
Caterpillars hump

Worms wiggle
Bugs giggle

Rabbit hop
Horses clop

Snakes slide
Sea gulls glide

Mice creep
Deer leap

Puppies bounce
Kittens pounce

Lions stalk
But I walk!

Have children pick out words that rhyme and think of other words in the same word family.  Ex. Wiggle, jiggle, giggle

(7) For assessment Provide each students with two rhyming words and ask what the difference between them is.  Select a final sound next and ask each student to make three words using the ending provided until every student has had a turn.  You might choose to record each student's response for later reference.

Reference:  Edelen-Smith, Patricia.  How Now Brown Cow:  Phoneme Awareness Activities for Collaborative Classrooms
www.Idonline.org/ld_inde_pth/teaching_techniques/cld_hownow.html

Dye, Renee.  Pre Reading (Word Families) (Rhyming).
www.lessonplanpage.com/LARhymingWordFamilies12Idea.htm

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