Loren Cutcliffe
Growing Independence and Fluency
 


What Does He Get?

Rationale: Students to avoid making mistakes usually use a slow and monotone pace. For students to comprehend the text, they need to learn to vary the rate of speed at which they read. This lesson is designed to help students learn how to speed up the pace of their reading.

Materials: Multiple copies of If You Give A Pig A Pancake by Laura Numeroff Publisher: Scholastic Inc., stop watchs (one of every two students), tape, chart with pictures of the items that the pig get in the order that he gets them (one per student), three or four paper pigs with the students names on them. This activity will be used to assess the students to see if they are reading any faster.

Procedure:
1. Introduce the lesson by giving a book talk on If You Give A Pig A Pancake. This should be very interesting for the students. Ex. OKAY, HAVE ANY OF YOU EVER GOTTEN SOMETHING AND WISHED THAT YOU HAD SOMETHING ELSE TO GO WITH IT? IN THIS BOOK THE PIG GET A PANCAKE BUT THEN HE WANTS SOME SYRUP. BUT ONCE HE GETS THE SYRUP HE… LET’S GET READY TO FIND OUT.

2. Next, Open the book If You Give A Pig A Pancake and read for about one minute. Read this very slow and use a monotone voice.

3. Ask the students what they thought about the way you read the book (wait for responses). Then say, “WHAT DO YOU THING I COULD HAVE DONE TO MAKE THE STORY SOUND MORE INTERESTING?”

4. It is very hard to understand what is going on in a book if it is read slowly and in one tone.

5. Read the same text again, but this time use expression and varied speeds. NOW, WASN’T THE BETTER.

6. Introduce the reading game and hand out the materials. Let each student read for one minute. Then let them put their pig on the place that shows where the pig was when they stopped. If they read till he got a bath, they would put their pig on the place on the chard that had a tub.

7. Allow the students to reread the book at least three or four more times. Let them record each time where they got with their pigs.

8. For assessment, evaluate the progress of the students by seeing the difference, if any, from the first time they read to the final time they read the book. This should show if any improvements were made.

Reference:
www.auburn.edu/rdggenie.breakthrough.html

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