Speeder Reader

 Car

Growing Independence and Fluency

By: Davis Snider

 

Rationale:

            For students to become fluent readers they have to read, reread, decode words, and be able to tell you about what they read. As readers get more practice reading, fluency eventually becomes natural. Fluency is the ability to read words at a fast pace, automatically and with no effort. After children become fluent readers then they are able to connect with the text and understand the meaning.  This lesson is to help students learn what fluency is and help them practice becoming fluent readers. In this lesson they will read and reread text so they will become familiar with it and develop fluency with the book.

 

Materials:

 

-  Whiteboard and dry erase marker

-  Pencil

-  Class set of Tiny Goes to the Library by Mavis Smith

-  Fluency Checklist for each students (second read my partner, third read my partner: remembered more words, read faster, read smoother, read slowly, stopped many times, and did not stop at all during reading)

-  Progress Chart for each student

-  Stopwatch

 

Procedure:

  1. First you should introduce the lesson by talking about how it is important for students to become fluent readers. Being a fluent reader means that you are able to read fast and without stopping to sound out words. You are able to recognize words and read them with no effort. Once you becoming a fluent reader text will become easier to read and make more sense because you are not trying to read it, you will be reading it using no effort. One way you can become a fluent reader is by reading the same text several times. Each time you read the text, you become faster because you already know the text. Today we are going to practice become fluent readers by reading a text several times and see how you improve.
  2. Before we begin lets work on what we should do if we get to a word that we can't read or don't know. "What should you do first?" "Ok good, we should first look at the vowel in the word." "After you know what the vowel is you should uncover the beginning of the word and see what sound it makes." "Last you should look at the end of the word and see what sounds are represented there." "Then you should put all the sounds together and see what the word is." "Let me show you how I would do this." "The word is camp. First I am going to cover-up all the letters except the vowel a. A makes the /a/ sound. Then I am going to uncover the beginning which is c. C makes the /k/ sound. So now I have /k/ /a/. Now I am going to uncover the ending sound and I have the /m/ sound and the /p/ sound. Now let's put it all together /k/ /a/ /m/ /p/ camp. Now you should go back to the beginning of the sentence with the word camp in it and reread it to see if the sentence makes more sense to you.
  3. Now you should demonstrate reading a sentence with and without fluency. This way children can see what fluency really means. Now write a sentence on the board (I went to camp on a bus) and show them how to read it fluently and how to read it without fluency. Teacher reads it " I w-e-n-t t-o c-a-m-p o-n a b-u-s." "Could anyone understand what I just read? Not that well could you? Now I am going to read it again. I went to camp on a bus. Now do you understand what I read? The second time I read the sentence was easier to understand because I did not spend so much time on every word. This is what we will be working on today."
  4. This book is about a dog named Tiny, But Tiny is not so little. Tiny goes to the library with his best friend. He is not allowed inside. When it's time to go home with all the books his friend got he doesn't really help. You will have to read and see what Tiny does instead of helping his friend carry the books.
  5. "Now, we are now going to practice reading with fluency. Remember you have to read the book several times to become a fluent reader, so it won't be perfect the first time." Pass out class set of Tiny Goes to the Library. "This book is Tiny Goes to the Library and I want you to read through the book a few times by your self and then we are going to discuss it. I am going to walk around and raise your hand if you need help."
  6. When everyone is done, I am going to ask them questions to see if the comprehended what they read. I will ask questions like: " What type of animal is tiny?" "What happened when tiny arrives to the library?" "What did Tiny do that was such a big help?"
  7. Now I will divide the students into partners. I will explain to them how to fill out the fluency checklist for a partner. The checklist includes (second read my partner, third read my partner: remembered more words, read faster, read smoother, read slowly, stopped many times, and did not stop at all during reading.) The students will now begin to read with their partners. Each person will read through the story once. On the second and third time their partner will check all that apply to the reading. The partners should then switch tasks.

 

Assessment:

            To assess the students, each student will come to my desk and read the book aloud. They will bring with them their checklist that their partner filled out for them. I will do a one-minute reading with the student assessing his/her fluency. I will have a progress chart for each student and I will mark on it where they are. Each time we do a fluency test, I will mark their progress on the chart for my records.

Checklist  

Second Read:

 

__________ Remembered more words

 

__________ Read faster

 

__________ Read smoother

 

__________ Read slowly

 

__________ Stopped many times during reading

 

__________ Did not stop during reading

 

 

Third Read:

 

__________ Remembered more words

 

__________ Read faster

 

__________ Read smoother

 

__________ Read slowly

 

__________ Stopped many times during reading

 

__________ Did not stop during reading

 

 

References:

 

Gainor, Brandi Go, Speed Racer: http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/begin/gainorgf.html

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