Gulping Grape Soda With G


Emergent Literacy

Caitlin Roebuck

 

Rationale:

This lesson will help students learn and understand the letter G and its phoneme, / g /. Students need to develop an understanding of phonemes and graphemes to begin the process of becoming an effective reader. In this lesson, students will learn to apply their understanding of g = / g / through learning a representation (i. e. gulping grape soda), looking at words containing the g = / g / correspondence, and reading a decodable story based on the / g / phoneme using choral reading.

 

Materials:

1.) 1 picture of someone drinking soda

2.) 1 small poster with the letter G written on it

3.) 1 laminated poster with a / g / tongue tickler written on it (Gary was glad to play games in grandmother's green garden)

4.) Whiteboard and 1 expo marker

5.) Go, Dog. Go! by P. D. Eastman

6.) Assessment sheet (1 per student)

7.) Marker or crayon (1 per student)

8.) 1 large piece of lined paper to model how to write the letter G

9.) Pieces of lined paper for the class to practice writing the letter G

 

Procedure:

1. Begin by introducing the lesson: Class, today we are going to be learning about the letter G and the sound that it makes, / g /. Show the class the poster of the letter G written on it. There are many different letters and sounds in our language, and we must learn how to recognize all of them before we begin to read. For our lesson today, we are going to focus on G by looking at and reading words with G and the / g / sound in them.

2. When we use the / g / sound, I want you to think of when you drink grape soda (or any kind of drink.) Show the picture of someone drinking soda. What sound do you make? Wait for students to answer. You make a g-g-g sound. So everyone put one of your hands to your mouth and pretend like your gulping grape soda and say g-g-g-g-g. What does your mouth do when you “gulp grape soda?” Your tongue starts at the top of the back part of your mouth and quickly comes down when air and the sound come out of your mouth. Watch me as I show you what my mouth looks like as I make the / g / sound. Demonstrate how to make the / g / sound. Now let's look at how to write the lowercase letter G. Get out a large sheet of the lined paper to model how to write a lowercase G. Class, when you begin to write a lowercase G, you will start like you are making a C but then you will begin to draw a line closing the C on the sidewalk, go down under the ditch and make a basket. Explain how to make the letter and illustrate how to draw it three more times. Pass out lined paper to the students. Now I want you to practice making a lowercase G. Give the students three to five minutes to practice.

3. Now listen as I try to find / g / in the word garden. Pronounce the word slowly and clearly, making sure to stress the / g / sound: /Gggggggarden/. Let’s all say it out loud together. /Gggggggarden/. Did you hear the / g / in garden? I heard it! Pronouncing it slowly: /Gggggarden/.

4. Get out the chart with the tongue tickler. Now let’s practice saying our / g / sound with a tongue tickler. Gary was glad to play games in grandmother’s green garden. Let’s say it together three more times. Now let’s stretch out each / g / sound in the tongue tickler: Gggggary was gggglad to play gggggames in ggggrandmother’s gggggreen gggggarden. Circle the letter G on the poster as the students stretch out each word with a G.

5. Now let’s try to find / g / in a list of words. I want you to raise your hand if you hear a word with the / g / sound in it. It could be at the beginning, middle, or end of the word. Do you hear / g / in get or bet? Wait for students to answer. Ok you hear / g / in get. Model explaining why / g / is in get and not in bet. Let’s stretch out each of the words. Gggggget and bbbbbbet. Think about gulping your grape soda with the letter G. You hear the g-g-g-g-g sound is in ggggget not bbbbbet. Let’s do some more examples. Do you hear / g / in gum or yum? See how the class answers and call on a student. Why did you pick that word? Do you hear / g / in pit or pig? See how the class answers and call on a student. Why did you pick that word? Do you hear / g / in bag or bad? See how the class answers and call on a student. Why did you pick that word? Do you hear / g / in grab or cab? See how the class answers and call on a student. Why did you pick that word?

6. Now we are going to read a book. This book is called Go, Dogs. Go! by P. D. Eastman. Booktalk: In this story, we will read about some dogs and different adventures they have. Some of these dogs do really crazy things, like sit on top of trees and drive cars! You will have to read the story to find out some of the other fun adventures they have. As we read this story, I want you to listen for words that have the / g / sound in them. 7. Read story with a big book using the choral reading method. Now I want you to raise your hand and share some of the words you read with the / g / sound in them. Call on 3 to 5 students to share and write the words on the whiteboard. Circle or underline the G in the word. Good job! Now let’s say these words together and act like we’re drinking our grape soda when we hear the / g / sound.

8. Now let’s see what you have learned about the letter G and the / g / sound today. We are going to do a worksheet, and I want you to color or circle only the things that start with the / g / sound. Pass out an assessment sheet and 1 marker per student.

 

Click here for the Assessment worksheet with Answer Key.

References:

 

·        Wheeler, Mary Kathryn. “Mmm, Mmm, Good!” http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/doorways/wheelerel.htm

 

·        Perry, Caroline. “G…G…G…Gulping Water” http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/doorways/perrycel.htm

 

·        Yancey, Noie. “Gus the Green Goat” http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/invitations/yanceyel.htm

 

Text:

·        Eastman, P. D. Go, Dog. Go! Random House. New York: 1961. Pp 72.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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