Smoothing Out the Bumps


Growing Independence and Fluency

By Lydia Hinshaw

Rational:  It is not enough to be able to read; you must be able to read fluently to best comprehend the message.  The main goal of reading is comprehension and therefore fluency is a very important component to being a good reader.  Comprehension requires so much of the reader's attention that you must decrease the time you spend on decoding.  Reading fluency has three parts: reading with expression, speed, and accuracy.   This lesson will use repeated reads and reading checklists to help the reader become more fluent by reading more smoothly.  Being a more fluent reader will mean more fun reading! 

Materials:

Whiteboard and expo marker for teacher

Check-sheets for each student found on next page

Pencils

Clipboards

Multiple copies of various Junie B. Jones books.  Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl,

Junie B. Jones First Grade (at last!), Junie B. Jones First grader: Boss of Lunch

Junie B. Jones First Grader: Toothless Wonder

Copy of  What will the Seal Eat?

Procedures

1. “Today we are going to talk about correct and incorrect ways to read a book.  First I will read a book called What Will the Seal Eat? The book is about a seal that is hungry but can't seem to find anything to eat.  Do you believe he will eventually find something to eat?  Let's read and see if he does.”  (Begin reading the first half of the book smoothly.  Then read the second half slow and choppy) Now ask the students if they noticed anything funny about how you read the book.  Ask them which part of the book was easier to understand, the first part (the part read fluently) or the second part (the part read poorly).  Hopefully they will notice the difference in your reading and you can discuss that with them.  “It sure is easier to understand what I am reading to you when it is smooth and not too slow right?”  It is the same way when you are reading to yourself.  You will understand the book a lot better if you can read it without stopping or sounding out words”. Then explain to the students that “In order to comprehend what we read, we must become fluent readers.  We can do this by reading and then rereading the same page of a book.  For example: I want you to read the sentence on the board slow and choppy.” (Write the sentence I want to go to Disneyland for my next birthday! on the board)  Now read the sentence smoothly and with expression.  “Which one sounds better?”  “The second one!  Because the words went smoothly together just like if you were saying that sentence in a conversation.” 

 
2.  “Before we starting reading, I would love for us to review what we do when we get stuck on a word. First, we take a shot by covering up part of the word to make it easier to sound out.  If this doesn’t work we read to the end of the sentence to see what word would make sense.  You can use the sentence to help you figure out the word you don’t know, it’s called crosschecking.  Can someone tell me what we do after we know the correct word?  Read the sentence again.  Right!  Always reread the sentence from the beginning so that you can pay attention to what the sentence says and how it fits into the story.  Very good class!”


3.  “Class I have a stack of books here that you can choose from.  They are all from the same series of books about a girl about your age.  In each book she gets into trouble and has to figure out how to get out of the dilemma.  One of the books here is called Junie B. Jones First Grader: Boss of Lunch and in this book Junie B. gets to help with lunch.  She gets to wear a hair net and help the lunch lady.  Will Junie B. become the boss of the whole schools lunch?  You will have to read and find out!  Each of you will pick out a book and before you do that I will tell you a little about the book series.”  Can someone tell me how we go about selecting a book when we have not heard a book talk on it?  Is it by the book's cover?  No it sure isn’t! You choose a book by reading a few passages from it and don’t forget the two finger test.  If, while reading, there are more than two words on a page that you can’t read, the book is not right for you.  Now I want each of you to choose a book to read.”
4.  “I want to show you how to reread.  Teacher turns to the whiteboard and reads the sentence on the board out loud: “Christmas is such a happy holiday that everyone is happy!”  (read the sentence slowly and sound out/blend the word holiday and everyone).  “Now I did not read that sentence very smoothly so I am going to reread the sentence. (reread the sentence smoothly).   “Now that everyone has a book, I want you to find a spot in the room where you will be comfortable.  I want you to whisper read just the first chapter of the book for fifteen minutes.  If you finish before fifteen minutes is over then reread the chapter.  Each time you read make sure to reread the sentences you struggle with.  Also make sure you think about reading smoothly.”

Assessment: (repeated reads) “Now we are going to play a game.  I want each of you to pick a partner.  Your partner will be responsible for completing a check sheet after each reading. Remember you can't skip a word.  Practice cover-ups and rereading to understand a word.  Now let's read the first five page of the book.”  That is great boys and girls.  Now let's switch whose reading.  Your partner will read his/her book while you fill out the check sheet.” (Repeat the procedure three times)  “Now we will see who read more smoothly”.
 

Comprehension Questions:

What kind of trouble did Junie B. get into in the section you read?

How did she solve or fix the problem she got into?

References:

 TheReadingGenie:http://www.auburn.edu/rdggenie/fluency.html                
 Park, Barbara.  Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl.  Random House Books for Young Readers; 2001

Park, Barbara.  Junie B., First Grader (At Last!). Random House Books for Young Readers; 2001

Park, Barbara.  Junie B., First Grader: Boss of Lunch. Random House Books for Young Readers; 2001

Park, Barbara.  Junie B., First Grader: Toothless Wonder. Random House Books for Young Readers; 2001

Windgard, Natalie.  Speed Racers: http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/persp/wingardgf.html

“What Will the Seal Eat?” By:  Hoff, S: Educational Insights, 1990

 

Check sheets:

 

Name__________________________

First read:

Read the words correctly (circle yes or write the number of words they got wrong) 

Yes  No________

Could you understand the reader has they read outloud?

Yes      No

 

Second read:

Read the words correctly (circle yes or write the number of words they got wrong) 

Yes  No________

Could you understand the reader has they read outloud?

Yes      No

Third Read:

Read the words correctly (circle yes or write the number of words they got wrong) 

Yes  No________

Could you understand the reader has they read out loud?

Yes      No

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